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Endometrial stripe thickness: a preoperative marker to identify patients with endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia who may benefit from sentinel lymph node mapping and biopsy
  1. Devon Abt1,2,
  2. Annliz Macharia1,
  3. Michele R Hacker1,2,
  4. Rasha Baig1,
  5. Katharine McKinley Esselen1,2 and
  6. Jennifer Ducie1,2,3
  1. 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  3. 3Midwest Gyn Oncology, Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jennifer Ducie, Midwest Gyn Oncology, Nebraska Methodist Hospital, NE 68814, USA; duciej13{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives The goal of our study was to identify preoperative factors in patients with endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia that are associated with concurrent endometrial cancer to select patients who may benefit from sentinel lymph node (SLN) assessment at the time of hysterectomy.

Methods Retrospective single institution cohort study of patients with a preoperative diagnosis of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia who underwent hysterectomy with or without staging from January 2010 to July 2020. Modified Poisson regression was used to calculate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results Of 378 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia, 275 (73%) had endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia and 103 (27%) had invasive cancer on final pathology. Age (p=0.003), race (p=0.02), and hypertension (p=0.02) were significantly associated with concurrent endometrial cancer. The median preoperative endometrial stripe was significantly greater in the endometrial cancer group (14 mm (range 10–19)) than in the endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia group (11 mm (range 8–16); p=0.002). A preoperative endometrial stripe ≥20 mm was associated with double the risk of endometrial cancer on final pathology (crude RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.9) and preoperative endometrial stripe ≥15 mm was 2.5 times more likely to be associated with high risk Mayo criteria on final pathology (crude RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.2). Of those with concurrent endometrial cancer, 5% were stage IB, 29% had tumors >2 cm, and 1% had grade 3 histology. Only 3% of all patients underwent lymph node evaluation.

Conclusions In a large cohort of patients with a preoperative diagnosis of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia, less than a third had invasive cancer and even fewer had pathologic features considered high risk for nodal metastasis, arguing against the use of routine SLN dissection in these patients. Endometrial stripe ≥15 mm may be a useful preoperative marker to identify patients at higher risk for concurrent endometrial cancer and may be an important criterion for use of selective SLN dissection in carefully selected patients with endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia.

  • endometrial hyperplasia
  • endometrial neoplasms
  • lymph nodes
  • sentinel lymph node
  • SLN and lympadenectomy

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. In accordance with the journal’s guidelines, we will provide our data for the reproducibility of this study in other centers if such is requested.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. In accordance with the journal’s guidelines, we will provide our data for the reproducibility of this study in other centers if such is requested.

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Footnotes

  • Presented at This work was presented as an oral presentation at the Society for Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting in March 2021, which was held virtually in the setting of COVID-19.

  • Contributors DA: writing-original draft preparation, data curation. AM: methodology, formal analysis, and data curation. RB: methodology and formal analysis. KME: writing-reviewing and editing. MRH: methodology, formal analysis, and writing-reviewing and editing. JD: conceptualization, methodology, supervision, writing-reviewing, editing, and guarantor.

  • Funding This work was conducted with support from Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health Award UL 1TR002541), and financial contributions from Harvard University and its affiliated academic healthcare centers.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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