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Placental site trophoblastic disease
  1. Guido Martin Rey Valzacchi, Presenter1,
  2. Diego Odetto, Discussant2,
  3. Carolina Beatriz Chacon, Radiologist3,
  4. Alejandra Wernicke, Radiologist4 and
  5. Yang Xiang, Pathologist5
  1. 1Gynecology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  2. 2Gynecologic Oncology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  3. 3Radiology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  4. 4Pathology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  5. 5Gynecologic Oncology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Dongcheng-qu, Beijing, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Guido Martin Rey Valzacchi, Gynecology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires 1199, Argentina; guido.rey{at}hospitalitaliano.org.ar

Abstract

A case study of a 38-year-old woman with a diagnosis of placental site trophoblastic tumor is presented. The patient had a 22-month history of amenorrhea since her last pregnancy, and a dilation and curettage procedure was performed after a 3.1×2.4×2.8 cm endometrial echogenic lesion was visualized on a pelvic ultrasound. When the diagnosis of placental site trophoblastic tumor was made by histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis, complementary examinations including including pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a chest computed tomography (CT) were done. There was no evidence of disease outside the uterus, and a laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingectomy was performed. After a surveillance period of 12 months, no disease recurrence was identified. Best imaging studies, treatment options, and proper surveillance for these type of tumors are discussed alongside the case study.

  • placental site trophoblastic tumor
  • gestational trophoblastic neoplasia
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Footnotes

  • Twitter @guidoreyv

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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