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BRCA status and platinum sensitivity in advanced ovarian cancer according to Chemotherapy Response Score
  1. Raffaella Ergasti1,2,
  2. Claudia Marchetti1,2,
  3. Riccardo Tudisco1,2,
  4. Adelaide Iervolino2,
  5. Angelica Naldini1,
  6. Riccardo Oliva1,2,
  7. Frediano Inzani1,
  8. Giovanni Scambia1,2 and
  9. Anna Fagotti1,2
  1. 1 Department of Woman, Child and Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy
  2. 2 Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Professor Giovanni Scambia, Department of Woman, Child and Public Health, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Roma, Lazio, Italy; giovanni.scambia{at}policlinicogemelli.it

Abstract

Objective To evaluate a relation between BRCA1/2 status and the Chemotherapy Response Score in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery.

Methods Data were retrospectively collected on patients with unresectable disease undergoing three or four cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery at the Gynecologic Oncology Unit of the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart from January 2016 to December 2020. All patients were assessed for BRCA1/2 somatic mutation at diagnosis. The omental specimens obtained at the interval surgery were evaluated according to Bohm’s Chemotherapy Response Score System.

Results A total of 172 patients were included in the analysis, 69 (40%) patients were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and 103 (60%) patients were wild type. In the wild-type group (BRCAwt), 73 (70.9%) patients had a Chemotherapy Response Score of 1 or 2 and 30 (29.1%) patients had a score of 3. In the BRCA1/2 carriers group (BRCAmut), 39 (56.5%) patients had a score of 1 or 2 and 30 (43.5%) patients had a score of 3. Among the BRCAwt group, those with a Chemotherapy Response Score of 3 had a prolonged median progression-free survival (22 vs 15 months, p=0.003). Among the BRCAmut carriers group, no differences were found (30 vs 27 months, p=0.55). No difference in overall survival was observed in either the BRCAmut carriers population (p=0.23) or the BRCAwt population (60 vs 44 months, p=0.06).

Conclusions Patients with BRCA1/2mut seem to achieve a score of 1, 2 or 3 with the same frequency. In contrast, patients with BRCAwt seem to have a score of 1 or 2 more frequently than a score of 3. In patients with BRCA1/2mut, this score may not be an indicator of chemosensitivity.

  • ovarian cancer
  • BRCA1 protein
  • BRCA2 protein

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available. All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available. All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplementary information.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RE (guarantor), CM, RT, RO: as gynecological oncologists, they were mainly involved in data collection, evaluating individual patients and the possibility of enrolling them in the study. AI: a medical student who was mainly involved in data transcription. AN: mainly involved in tumor samples collection in the operating room. FI: a gynecology dedicated pathologist, mainly involved in CRS evaluation on the omental specimens. GS, AF: mainly involved in planning the retrospective study and surveying all the staff working around it. They also participated in sample collection during surgery.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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