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Distinctive clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis for different histologic subtypes of early cervical cancer
  1. Lijie Cao1,2,
  2. Hao Wen1,2,
  3. Zheng Feng1,2,
  4. Xiaotian Han1,2 and
  5. Xiaohua Wu1,2
  1. 1 Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
  2. 2 Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Xiaohua Wu, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China; wu.xh{at}fudan.edu.cn

Abstract

Objectives To compare clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis for different histologic subtypes in early cervical cancer.

Methods Patients who underwent radical surgery for stage IA2–IIA2 cervical cancer with squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or adenosquamous carcinoma between March 2006 and February 2014 at our institution were retrospectively evaluated. The two-sample t-test was used to compare the mean values of continuous variables. The Chi-square test was used to assess differences in the distribution of categorical variables. Survival curves were generated by the Kaplan-Meier method using log-rank test. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using Cox regression analysis.

Results Of 5181 patients evaluated, 4510 had squamous cell carcinoma, 488 had adenocarcinoma, and 183 had adenosquamous carcinoma. Compared with squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma was associated with earlier stage, smaller tumor size, less lymphovascular space invasion (26.7% vs 37.9%), less deep (>2/3 depth) stromal invasion (30.4% vs 36.2%), and more ovarian metastasis (4.2% vs 0.7%) (all p<0.001). Compared with adenosquamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma was associated with earlier stage (p=0.011), smaller tumor size (p<0.001), less lymphovascular space invasion (26.7% vs 41.5%, p<0.001), and less peripheral nerve infiltration (5.7% vs 15.4%, p<0.001). Except for more peripheral nerve infiltration in adenosquamous carcinoma (15.4% vs 8.4%, p=0.002), no significant differences in other clinicopathologic characteristics were noted between squamous cell carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma. Five-year recurrence-free survival was 85.1%, 78.2%, and 72.3% for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and adenosquamous carcinoma, respectively (p<0.001). Corresponding 5-year overall survival was 89.7%, 83.1%, and 79.6%, respectively (p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma were independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival for adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma (HR 2.594 (95% CI 2.030 to 3.316), p<0.001) and for adenosquamous carcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma (HR 2.105 (95% CI 1.517 to 2.920), p<0.001), and overall survival for adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma (HR 2.976 (95% CI 2.226 to 3.977), p<0.001) and for adenosquamous carcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma (HR 2.295 (95% CI 1.579 to 3.338), p<0.001).

Conclusion Squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and adenosquamous carcinoma carried distinctive patterns of clinicopathologic characteristics. Adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma had worse survival outcomes than squamous cell carcinoma.

  • adenocarcinoma
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Footnotes

  • LC and HW are joint first authors.

  • Contributors All authors contributed to study design, data interpretation, and writing. Data analysis was primarily performed by LC.

  • Funding The authors gratefully acknowledge the contribution of the study investigator, Chunyan Song, without whom the study would not have been possible.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available upon reasonable request.

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