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Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor use in ovarian cancer: expanding indications and novel combination strategies
  1. Emily Hinchcliff1,
  2. Shannon Neville Westin2,
  3. Graziela Dal Molin1,
  4. Christopher J LaFargue1 and
  5. Robert L. Coleman1
  1. 1 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
  2. 2 Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Robert L. Coleman, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States; rcoleman{at}mdanderson.org

Abstract

The use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition is transforming care for the treatment of ovarian cancer, with three different PARP inhibitors (PARPi) gaining US Food and Drug Administration approval since 2014. Given the rapidly expanding use of PARPi, this review aims to summarize the key evidence for their use and therapeutic indications. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the development of PARPi resistance and the emerging role of PARPi combination therapies, including those with anti-angiogenic and immunotherapeutic agents.

  • medical oncology
  • ovarian cancer
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Footnotes

  • Funding This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. This work is supported in part by the MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant (P30 CA016672), and a T32 training grant for gynecologic oncology (CA101642; to K.H. Lu) and the SPORE in Ovarian Cancer SPORE in ovarian cancer (P50 CA083639). RC is supported in part by CPRIT RP120214, the Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Judy Reis/Albert Pisani, MD, and the MD Anderson Ovarian Cancer Research fund. Other parts of this work are supported by R35 CA209904, the Frank McGraw Memorial Chair in Cancer Research, the American Cancer Society Research Professor Award and the Blanton-Davis Ovarian Cancer Research Program. SNW is supported by the Andrew Sabin Family Fellowship. The funding sources had no input into the design, conduct, or preparation of the review.

  • Competing interests RLC has clinical research funding from Merck, AstraZeneca/Medimmune, Genentech/Roche, Novartis, Clovis Oncology, Abbvie, and Janssen pharmaceuticals. RLC receives consulting fees from: Genmab, Tesaro, Agenus, OncoMed, Novocure, Oncoquest,Merck, AstraZeneca/Medimmune, Genentech/Roche, Novartis, Clovis Oncology, Abbvie, Janssen pharmaceuticals, aravive, OncoSecSNW has clinical research funding from ArQule, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Clovis Oncology, Cotinga Pharmaceuticals, Novartis, Roche/Genentech, and Tesaro. SNW receives consulting fees from AstraZeneca, Clovis Oncology, MediVation, Merck, Ovation, Pfizer, Takeda, and Tesaro. These disclosed companies and grant funding sources had no input into the design, conduct, or preparation of the manuscript.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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