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PAX1 Methylation as a Potential Biomarker to Predict the Progression of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia: A Meta-analysis of Related Studies
  1. Ting Luan, MD*,
  2. Quan Hua, MD*,
  3. Xia Liu, MD,
  4. Pengfei Xu, MD*,
  5. Yun Gu, MD*,
  6. Hua Qian, MD,
  7. Lina Yan, MD*,
  8. Xueqin Xu, BD,
  9. Rong Geng, BD,
  10. Xin Zeng, PhD* and
  11. Ping Li, MD*
  1. * Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Medical Institute, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing;
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jiangsu Taizhou People's Hospital, Taizhou; and
  3. Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Xin Zeng, PhD, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Medical Institute, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, 210004 Nanjing, China. E-mail: august555482{at}126.com; or Ping Li. E-mail: liping0099{at}126.com.

Abstract

Objective The methylation of paired box gene 1 (PAX1) has a great influence on the process of cervical lesion. However, available evidence for the association between PAX1 methylation and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are inconsistent. Here, we systematically reviewed and analyzed PAX1 methylation in progress of CIN.

Methods Two investigators independently searched eligible studies of PAX1 methylation and CIN that were published in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases until November 30, 2016. We extracted clinicopathologic features of CIN and cervical cancel relevant to PAX1 methylation. Odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association between PAX1 methylation and progression of patients with CIN.

Results Seven studies composed of 1055 patients with various stages of CIN and cervical cancel were eventually included. The results revealed that PAX1 methylation was associated with transition of CIN I to CIN II/III (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.04–0.19) and CIN II/III to cervical cancer (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.05–0.46), and similar results were produced in sensitivity analysis. Also, we found that the OR value was associated with average age and number of patients, publication year, and study location of included articles.

Conclusions PAX1 gene methylation was associated with the transition of CIN I to CIN II/III and CIN II/III to cervical cancer, so that it could be an auxiliary biomarker to estimate the risk of CIN progress. Moreover, PAX1 may help to determine appropriate reexaminations and treatment for patients with various stages of CIN.

  • Biomarker
  • Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia
  • Meta-analysis
  • Methylation
  • Paired box gene 1

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Footnotes

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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