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Practice Patterns of Hereditary Ovarian Cancer Management in Korea
  1. Min Chul Choi, MD*,
  2. Myong Cheol Lim, MD, PhD,,
  3. Maria Lee, MD, PhD§,
  4. Min Kyu Kim, MD, PhD,
  5. Dong Hoon Suh, MD, PhD,
  6. Yong Jung Song, MD, PhD#,
  7. Tae-Joong Kim, MD, PhD**,
  8. Suk-Joon Chang, MD, PhD†† and
  9. Jae-Weon Kim, MD, PhD§
  1. *Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam;
  2. Gynecologic Cancer Branch, Center for Uterine Cancer, Center for Clinical Trials, and
  3. Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang;
  4. §Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul;
  5. Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Changwon;
  6. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam;
  7. #Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan-si;
  8. **Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul; and
  9. ††Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Myong Cheol Lim, MD, PhD, Gynecologic Cancer Branch, Center for Uterine Cancer, Center for Clinical Trials and Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 323, Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 10408, Korea. E-mail: gynlim@gmail.com.

Abstract

Objective This study aims to evaluate practice patterns for managing hereditary ovarian cancer among Korean gynecologic oncologic physicians.

Methods Members of the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology participated in the inaugural Hereditary Gynecologic Cancer Symposium or were invited to this survey by e-mail from January to February 2016. The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire.

Results Most physicians (66.7%, 36/54) responded to draw a pedigree of patients with a family history. The rate of genetic test recommendations for patients at risk for ovarian cancer was high (96.3%, 52/54). Physicians tended to select appropriate candidates for the genetic test. Of the respondents, genetic counseling was commonly performed before the genetic test (76.6%, 36/47) and provided by the specialist consultant(s) (78.7%, 37/47) or the physician alone (12.8%, 6/47). Participants showed mature response to risk management for the BRCA carriers: at least annual gynecologic surveillance (89.4%, 42/47), recommendation for chemoprevention (76.6%, 36/47), and advice for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (85.1%, 40/47). Risk-reducing salpingectomy with delayed oophorectomy as an alternative to risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy was considered to recommend in most of respondents (91.5%, 43/47).

Conclusions Gynecologic oncologic physicians in Korea had high awareness to genetic risk assessment, candidate selection to genetic test, and risk-reducing strategies for the management of hereditary ovarian cancer.

  • BRCA mutation
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Fallopian tubes
  • Peritoneum
  • Practice patterns

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Footnotes

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

  • Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.ijgc.net).

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