Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Cancer-Related Concerns Among Women With a New Diagnosis of Gynecological Cancer: An Exploration of Age Group Differences
  1. Shannon Myers Virtue, PsyD*,
  2. Sharon L. Manne, PhD*,
  3. Melissa Ozga, DO,
  4. David W. Kissane, MD,,
  5. Stephen Rubin, MD§,
  6. Carolyn Heckman, PhD,
  7. Norm Rosenblum, MD and
  8. John J. Graff, PhD*
  1. *Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ;
  2. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY;
  3. Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY;
  4. §University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA;
  5. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; and
  6. Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Shannon Myers Virtue, PsyD, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany, New Brunswick, NJ 08903. E-mail: myerssb{at}cinj.rutgers.edu.

Abstract

Objective The study aimed to characterize cancer-related concerns among women with a new diagnosis of gynecological cancer from a developmental life stage perspective. The study compared the degree of cancer-related concern between young women (45 years or younger), middle age women (46–64 years), and older women (65 years or older).

Materials/Methods Data from women (N = 243) with a condition diagnosed as primary gynecological cancer who were participating in a randomized control trial were analyzed. Women completed a measure that assessed the degree of concern in 12 cancer-related domains (physical functioning, cancer treatment, emotional functioning, sexual functioning, disease progression/death, own well-being, partner well-being, relationship with spouse/partner, body image, relationship with others, employment, and finances). Multivariate comparisons were made between the 3 age groups on the cancer-related concerns.

Results There were age group differences in overall cancer-related concern and specific cancer-related domains. Young women reported the greatest cancer-related concern (P < 0.001). They reported greater concern over emotional functioning (P < 0.001) and sexual functioning (P < 0.001) compared to the middle- and older-age groups. Older women reported less concern over the impact of cancer on finances (P = 007). There were no differences between age groups in concern over physical impairment, cancer treatment, disease progression/death, own well-being, partner well-being, relationship with spouse/partner, body image, and relationship with others.

Conclusions Age may play an important role in the impact of a gynecological cancer diagnosis in domains of functioning, specifically emotional functioning, sexual functioning, and finances. Other cancer-related areas may represent more universal degree of impact. Professionals may benefit from considering the impact of cancer from a developmental life stage perspective.

  • Gynecological cancer
  • Cancer-related concern
  • Age
  • Developmental stage
  • Quality of life

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • This work was funded by NIH grant R01 CA085566 to Sharon L. Manne. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.