Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Elevated White Blood Cell Count at the Time of Recurrence Diagnosis Is an Indicator of Short Survival in Patients With Recurrent Cervical Cancer
  1. Seiji Mabuchi, MD, PhD*,
  2. Yuri Matsumoto*,,
  3. Toshimitsu Hamasaki,
  4. Mahiru Kawano*,
  5. Takeshi Hisamatsu*,
  6. David G. Mutch and
  7. Tadashi Kimura*
  1. *Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan;
  2. Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO; and
  3. Department of Biomedical Statistics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Seiji Mabuchi, MD, PhD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. E-mail: smabuchi@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of elevated white blood cell (WBC) count at the time of the diagnosis of cervical cancer recurrence.

Methods The baseline characteristics and outcome data of 219 patients who had a diagnosis of recurrent cervical cancer between April 1996 and September 2010 were collected and reviewed. Survival after recurrence was compared between the leukocytosis group (WBC ≥9000/μL) and the nonleukocytosis group (WBC <9000/μL). A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to investigate the prognostic significance of elevated WBC count in patients with recurrent cervical cancer.

Results The patients in the leukocytosis group showed significantly shorter disease-free interval (P = 0.0005) and more frequently had multiple recurrences (P = 0.0101) than those in the nonleukocytosis group. The median survival after recurrence of the patients with elevated WBC count was 9 months, which was significantly shorter than the 21 months observed in the patients without normal WBC count (log rank; P < 0.0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that clinical stage, tumor diameter, histology, an elevated WBC count (≥9000/μL), and an elevated neutrophil count (≥6500/μL) were significant prognostic factors in survival after recurrence.

Conclusion The elevated WBC count at the time of the diagnosis of recurrence is an independent prognostic factor in patients with recurrent cervical cancer.

  • Leukocytosis
  • WBC
  • Neutrophilia
  • Recurrent cervical cancer
  • Survival

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

  • Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s Web site (www.ijgc.net).

  • S Mabuchi and Y Matsumoto contributed equally to this work.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.