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Determination of Integrated HPV58 Sequences in Cervical Lesions
  1. Hui Li, BS*,
  2. Ruifen Zhang, PhD*,
  3. Yupin Cai, MS*,
  4. Yuan Li, MD,
  5. Xuemei Cheng, BS,
  6. Baoli Zhu, PhD*,
  7. Yi Yang, MD and
  8. Yang Xiang, MD
  1. *Microbial Genome Research Center, CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; and
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Yi Yang, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No.1 Shuaifuyuan, Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730, China. E-mail: yangyi8835{at}126.com and Yang Xiang, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Wangfujing, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730, China. E-mail: xiangyang65{at}gmail.com.

Abstract

Integration of high-risk HPV in host genome is an important event in cervical cancer development. This study was aimed to analyze the integration of HPV58, a high-risk type that is prevalent in cervical lesions from southeastern Asia. Detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences by ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing revealed 8 integrations in 5 samples, and virus integration was found present in 2 samples with early lesion. Sequence analysis of the viral-cellular junctions showed that E1 disruption in virus genome was an early and common event during HPV58 infection. In 6 integrations, DNA fragments of HPV58 genome integrated into the repetitive element sequences of host genome.

  • Human papillomavirus 58
  • Integration
  • Repetitive element
  • Disruption of E1 gene

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Footnotes

  • This study was supported by the Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission (No. D09050703570906) and the Program for Key Infectious Diseases (No. 2009ZX10601).

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