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Cervical, Uterine Corpus, and Ovarian Cancer Mortality in Greece During 1980 to 2005: a Trend Analysis
  1. Evangelia Pavlidou, MD, MSc*,,
  2. Menelaos Zafrakas, MD, PhD,
  3. Nikolaos Papadakis, PhD*,
  4. Alexios Benos, MD* and
  5. Theodoros Agorastos, MD, PhD
  1. *Department of Hygiene,
  2. 4th Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and
  3. 3rd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokrateion Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.
  1. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Theodoros Agorastos, MD, PhD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Director of the 4th Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Hippokrateion Hospital, Konstantinoupoleos 49, 54642 Thessaloniki, Greece. E-mail: agorast{at}auth.gr.

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the present study was to analyze cervical, uterine corpus, and ovarian cancer mortality, between 1980 and 2005, in Greece.

Methods: Mortality data and population age distribution were provided by the National Statistical Service of Greece. Time trends of mortality were calculated for each tumor type per 100,000 women in the whole female population of Greece, and 2 different age groups, that is, women aged 49 years and younger and those 50 years and older. Joinpoint regression was used for further analysis of mortality trends.

Results: Overall, cervical and uterine corpus cancer mortality in the whole female population of Greece had a slightly decreasing trend between 1980 and 2005, whereas ovarian cancer mortality rates increased steadily throughout the period studied. Subgroup analyses according to age showed that cervical cancer mortality decreased very slightly only in women older than 50 years, whereas it remained steady in younger women. Uterine corpus cancer mortality decreased slightly in both age groups, but increased during the last years of the study period in the older age group. Ovarian cancer mortality increased in women older than 50 years, whereas it remained steady in the younger age group. Joinpoint regression analysis showed that only the increase after 1997 in the mortality trend for uterine corpus cancer in women 50 years and older was statistically significant (P = 0.0044).

Conclusions: Although our findings regarding cervical cancer mortality in Greece are encouraging, still more efforts are needed, particularly in preventing cervical cancer in younger women. The increasing trend of uterine corpus and ovarian cancer mortality in older women suggests that development of well-organized tertiary centers for the implementation of modern therapeutic modalities is urgently needed.

  • Cervical cancer
  • Uterine corpus cancer
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Mortality
  • Time trends

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Footnotes

  • The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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